Re-stretching of a Painting

Re-stretching of a Painting

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Intro

This is the painting before it was re-stretched. It is an oil painting from 1995, called Frits watching TV (Red). Frits, the current owner, depicted in the painting is holding the painting.↓

Kim Engelen, Owner Frits holding Painting, Frits Watching TV (Red-Feyenoord), 1995

The Dutch Flag

This painting was one panel of an originally large nine-paneled art piece. Which I made while studying at the Art Academy. Work Story →

Kim Engelen, Dutch Flag-Frits Watching TV, 9 Oil Paintings, 1995

Re-stretched by

The painting has been re-stretched by Art-Dealer Neo in Roermond (Netherlands).  Owner Gino Vrancen himself took care of it. Gino is also a professional art restorer, so I felt the painting was safe in his hands.

Examination

Gino took the painting to his working table to examine and measure it.

Kim Engelen, Measuring the Painting, Frits Watching TV (Red), 1995

Taking ofF the Hanging wire

From the backside of the frame, the self-fabricated hanging wire was removed using a pair of cut-pliers.

Kim Engelen, Taking off the Hanging-Wire, Frits Watching TV, Oil-Painting, 1995

taking off the corners

Then with a staple lifter,the four corners were removed.

Kim Engelen, Taking off the Canvas from its Stretcher Frame, Frits Watching TV, Oil-Painting, 1995

Taking out Staples

And then finally with flat nose pliers, all the staples that connected the canvas to its stretcher bars were taken out.

Kim Engelen, Taking out the Staples, Frits Watching TV, Oil-Painting, 1995

Taking off the Canvas

Now the canvas was not connected anymore with staples to the stretcher bars and, in theory, could be taken off its original flat canvas stretcher. 

Kim Engelen, Taking off the canvas of its stretcher bars, Frits Watching TV, Oil-Painting, 1995

Gesso-Glued

However, the gesso I used to prepare the canvas back in 1995 had permeated through the porous canvas and glued, as it were, a part of the cotton on the upper stretcher-bar. So Gino had to be careful when removing the canvas not to rip the canvas.

Kim Engelen, Carefully removing the Canvas, Frits Watching TV, Oil-Painting, 1995

Measuring again

Fortunately, the canvas was removed safely from its stretcher bar, and Gino measured the canvas again to double-check the sizes for the new stretcher bars.

Kim Engelen, Measuring the Canvas again, Frits Watching TV, Oil-Painting, 1995

Custom Sized Stretcher Bars

Four new stretcher bars were custom-sized sawn. The new bars have the outer edge beveled. And have a slope on the front face of the bar to prevent stretcher marks. (When the stretcher bars become visible in the canvas). 

Kim Engelen, Custom Sized Stretcher Bars, Frits Watching TV, Oil-Painting, 1995

Keyable Canvas Stretchers

A painting will absorb moisture over the years and therefore expands, which could cause the canvas to sag. Besides how it looks, it could potentially also cause damage to the layers of oil paint. Keyable stretcher bars prevent this. The keys, by keying, can adjust the tension of a canvas in small additions. 

Kim Engelen, Keyable Canvas Stetchers, Frits Watching TV, Oil-Painting, 1995

Assembly of the frame

Gino puts the frame together by connecting its joints. And with a mallet, a hammer with a rubber head, he makes sure the corners meet.

Kim Engelen, Putting the Frame together, Frits Watching TV, Oil-Painting, 1995

Checking the Frame

With a carpenter square, Gino checked if the frame was straight. The frame is square when there is no open space between the ruler and the stretcher bars. Another way to do this is to measure the frame diagonals.

Kim Engelen, Checking the new Frame, Frits Watching TV, Oil-Painting, 1995

Stretching the canvas

Gino laid the canvas over the new stretcher bars. And connected and stretched the canvas working his way out from the middle. 

Kim Engelen, Step 14, Re-Stretching the Painting, Frits Watching TV, Oil-Painting, 1995

Stretching Pliers

He used muscle power and occasionally canvas stretcher pliers.

Kim Engelen, Re-Stretching the Painting, Frits Watching TV, Oil-Painting, 1995

Staple Gun

And a regular hand staple gun to connect the canvas to the new stretcher frame.

Kim Engelen, Stapling the Painting on the new Stretcher Bars, Frits Watching TV, Oil-Painting, 1995

Water Soluble-Tape

The painting was now re-stretched on the new stretcher frame. Gino taped the canvas to the new framework with water-soluble tape

Kim Engelen, Step 13, Taping the Canvas, Frits Watching TV, Oil-Painting, 1995

Final Check

At present, the re-stretched painting is straight again. And it has now beveled bars with keys to protect it for many more years to come

Kim Engelen, Step 15, Final Check, Frits Watching TV, Oil-Painting, 1995

Floater Frame

The re-stretching of the painting is ready. We went a step further and choose a bold, thick floater frame. This is a box-like frame with the front open and no glass. It looks as if the painting is floating in the frame.

Kim Engelen, Frits (Red-Feyenoord), Oil Painting, Sideview-Frame, 1995

Certificate of Authenticity 

I created a new Certificate of Authenticity where I added that the painting was re-stretched and framed in 2021.

This COA I have placed in a plastic cover to give to the owner. So he can safely store the COA-certificate in his, for example, admin folder with other Certificates of Authenticity or other securities and warranty papers. 

Kim Engelen, Frits (Red-Feyenoord), Framed, 1995

On the back are two stickers. One with the details and my jumping logo with url. 

Kim Engelen, Frits (Red-Feyenoord), Framed, Backside, 1995

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